Basic Biographical Details

Name: Kelly & Dickie
Designation: Architectural practice
Started: 1905
Ended: 1911
Bio Notes: The partnership of Archibald Campbell Dickie was a short-lived one, lasting only from 1905 to 1911 and based in offices at 446 Oxford Street, London.

Dickie was born in Dundee in 1868 and apprenticed to John Carver's Forfar office in 1885 and remained as assistant, the practice being then Carver and Symon, until 1893 when he joined first the office of Beeston & Burmester, London, and secondly that of Frederick H Jones (not in British Architectural Library directory) Parliament Street, Westminster for experience. He also served as senior assistant in the office of J J Stevenson. During that period he worked either for or with Stanley D Adshead and with John Anderson from Marshall Mackenzie's office on competitions, but without success. He was one of the five original day students at the Architectural Association in Great Marlborough Street and passed the qualifying exam in 1894, being elected ARIBA on 11 March 1895, his proposers being Herbert Duncan Searles-Wood, a prominent member of the Architectural Association, Frederick Richard Farrow and Samuel Flint Clarkson.

In 1894 Dickie was appointed architect to the Palestine Exploration Expedition Fund where he worked under the supervision of Masterman and Bliss and remained until 1897. In the course of that work the Church of the Pool of Siloam and the Madebe mosaic were discovered. In 1898 he and Bliss, with whom he worked closely, published 'Excavations in Jerusalem 1894-97'. His work on the early churches of Palestine and Syria generally and on The Great Mosque at Damascus was subsequently summarised in R Phené Spiers 'Architecture East and West' 1905. On his return he joined the office of Arthur Beresford Pite and may have had some influence on that architect's transition from Italian Mannerist to neo-Greek at that time. While with Pite he maintained his interest in archaeology and worked with R C Bosanquet on the excavations at Borcoviens on the Roman Wall. From Pite's office he became briefly a partner in Dunn & Watson's practice at Bedford Row, Bloomsbury (c.1898-1904), taking in as assistant Alexander Symon, the son of Archibald Symon, his employer in Forfar, in 1899. The partnership was described by Theodore Fyfe as sharing an office rather than an actual partnership. Commissions were few and he was soon glad to accept a mastership for evening work under Hugh Patrick Guario Maule, a friend from his days in J J Stevenson's office, at the Architectural Association. Shortly thereafter he gave up his association with Dunn & Watson and formed a partnership with Claude Kelly, master of design at the Architectural Association. This lasted until 1911 when Dickie was appointed Professor of Architecture at Victoria University of Manchester in succession to Capper. He remained there until his retirement in 1933. According to Theodore Fyfe, 'Dickie was a born teacher, knowing what he wanted and doing it thoroughly and well; in the process making himself immensely popular with students, helpers and colleagues. At the same time his sanity and soundness were apparent in the counsels of the Board of Architectural Education and its schools Committee.'

He retained his interest in archaeology throughout his life being a member of the Palestine Exploration Fund executive committee from 1906 until his death and was its secretary, 1910-12, and being involved with the British School at Athens.

Dickie retired to a life in the country at Long Crendon, Buckinghamshire and died on 3 September 1941. He was remembered by Fyfe as 'a most loveable character, brimful of a warm-hearted humour' and 'universally popular'.

Private and Business Addresses

The following private or business addresses are associated with this architectural practice:
 AddressTypeDate fromDate toNotes
Item 1 of 1446, Oxford Street, London, EnglandBusiness1905 *  

* earliest date known from documented sources.


Employment and Training

Employees or Pupils

The following individuals were employed or trained by this architectural practice (click on an item to view details):
 NameDate fromDate toPositionNotes
Item 1 of 3Archibald Campbell Dickie19051911Partner 
Item 2 of 3Claude Kelly19051911Partner 
Item 3 of 3Alfred Louis HayMay 1905September 1905Assistant 

Buildings and Designs

This architectural practice was involved with the following buildings or structures from the date specified (click on an item to view details):
 Date startedBuilding nameTown, district or villageIslandCity or countyCountryNotes
Item 1 of 41909Mission HospitalHebron  Palestine 
Item 2 of 41911Church of St SaviourLewisham LondonEngland 
Item 3 of 4Before 1912Memorial ChurchPetersham SurreyEnglandInterior decoration
Item 4 of 4Before 1912R C ChurchClapham LondonEngland 

References

Currently, there are no references for this architectural practice. The information has been derived from: the British Architectural Library / RIBA Directory of British Architects 1834-1914; Post Office Directories; and/or any sources listed under this individual's works.